I have dyslexia, like my father. It has affected my reading while learning. I used to get teased for not being able to read properly. When I...

Krystle-Rae's Red Letter

14:10:00 My Red Letter Dyslexia Awareness 0 Comments

I have dyslexia, like my father. It has affected my reading while learning. I used to get teased for not being able to read properly. When I was 10 years old I was browsing the newspaper and came across an article that I thought mum would like to hear. She asked me to read it out loud while she was cooking. The words I read were not the words on the page and were heavily disjointed. She realised there was a problem. 

We were a low income family. My parents took me to see a psychologist but the sessions were too expensive. After the first session (diagnosis), mum sat me down and told me we couldn't afford to continue the sessions and that I would just have to try harder. So I did. 

It would (and still does) take me about 10 times to read something before I understand what some text (or a sign) is saying. In doing so it probably improves my comprehension. But it is exhausting. 

I studied maths b & c, physics, biology, chemistry, and English in senior school and received an OP5. The most difficult challenge was the Queensland Core Skills (QCS) test. Two of the exams were multiple choice and I only ever get half way through reading and answering the paper. I tried to get special consideration (or extra time) for the exam but the results of my dyslexia assessment (where they asked yr8 level maths and English) indicated I wasn't "severely" dyslexic. Therefore, my grades in class (high) didn't match my average score in the QCS test. 

I went on to study a bachelor of civil engineering and a bachelor of economics at university. I've been working in the industry for about 10 years now, have become chartered in two countries, and I hope to finish a part-time masters degree in July 2017. 

I'm still yet to publish a professional paper because I'm scared of academic writing and carrying out the academic research. Thankfully I have a mentor at work who will be helping me through the process. 

Someone interviewed me to encourage girls to study science; Young Woman in Science 

There is certainly a bright future for those with dyslexia. It just requires a bit more determination, hard work and someone who believes you can do it. Extra time can help take the pressure off too. 

Thanks for your efforts in raising awareness. 

Kind regards
Krystle-Rae

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